News

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Today’s Pasadena is difficult to imagine without thinking about science, making it a natural setting for a satellite event to the national March for Science in Washington, DC, and the local one in downtown Los Angeles. Spearheaded by Caltech postdocs, the Pasadena event will be family-friendly fun on Earth Day, Saturday, April 22.

The Caltech Postdoc Association plans a rally, march and outreach day in order to celebrate science, advocate for transparency and the support of science, as well as celebrate ties between scientists and the community of Pasadena. The march begins at Caltech’s Beckman Lawn at 8 a.m. where, after opening remarks, participants will head toward Memorial Park (approximately1.6 miles). After closing comments marchers can visit science booths for information and participation.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Pasadena-area State Assemblyman Chris Holden joined other state, labor and community leaders Wednesday in a press conference by the California Legislative Black Caucus to support a resolution against President Donald Trump’s federal budget proposals.

Resolution HR 28, authored by Assemblyman Mike Gipson, takes aim at Trump’s budget proposals related to healthcare, immigration, worker protection and their disproportionate impact on the African American community.

“For generations, federal policies like the Civil Rights Act, Educational Opportunity Grant, and most recently the Affordable Care Act, have lifted millions of black families out of poverty and provided an expansion of resources and gave them the chance to live the American Dream to the fullest,” Gipson said. “Now, all of this progress is under attack.”

Supporting the resolution, Holden called Trump’s budget proposals a “hard power” approach.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

SOUTH PASADENA >> Assemblyman Chris Holden introduced legislation that would prohibit building a tunnel to close the 6.2-mile gap of the 710 Freeway between the 10 and 210 freeways, the assemblyman announced Thursday.

This is the first time a piece of legislation would aim to kill the controversial project proposed by Caltrans. The freeway tunnel project would run through El Sereno, South Pasadena and Pasadena and has divided communities in the San Gabriel Valley.

Monday, September 12, 2016

State Assemblyman Chris Holden’s bill 1696, which cleared the Senate Appropriation Committee last month, will make it easier for California’s low income residents to quit smoking.

The bill requires tobacco cessation medications, counseling, and assessments to be covered for Medi-Cal patients.  Besides the detrimental health effects, smoking takes an $18.1 billion toll on California annually, according to a University of California, San Francisco study.

“Smoking continues to be the leading preventable cause of the death in the United States” said Holden. “We have an opportunity to save lives and money with this bill.”

As excerpted from Los Angeles Sentinel

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Pasadena - Congratulations to our California Legislative Black Caucus scholarship recipients from the 41st Assembly District:

Scholarship Winners

LtoR: Jenee Francis, Angelica (Zuri) Bazzell-O'Balles, Michaela Jordan, CLBC Scholar Ruby Dyson, Brenden Haymond, CLBC Scholar Braxton Williams (not pictured).

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

(Calif.) More avenues to college and career fields would be open to a broader array of high school students under legislation that has moved to the state Senate for consideration.

AB 288 would provide greater flexibility for K-12 and community college districts to establish or expand dual enrollment programs that allow high school students, while working toward graduation, to simultaneously take part in college-level career technical education courses or classes that count for credit toward a degree.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015


As Gov. Jerry Brown (right) enters the Assembly chambers for a swearing-in ceremony in December of 2014, he shakes hands with Pasadena native and state Assemblyman Chris Holden, while Chris’ father, Nate, looks on. Brown has worked with each of the Holdens during his two terms as governor (Nate was a state senator in 1974-78).

The nasty side of politics includes forgotten promises, backroom deals and leaders pushing personal agendas, even when it means pushing constituents into harm’s way.

But local politician Chris Holden’s first-hand knowledge of those types of dealings didn’t come from the state Assembly floor, where he serves today. The son of a longtime local politician, he learned those lessons the hard way on the hardwood, when politics pushed the big man to the back of the bench.