Assemblymember Holden Introduces Legislation to Extend and Expand Dual Enrollment

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Assemblymember Holden Introduces Legislation to Extend and Expand Dual Enrollment

Sacramento (CA) – Today, Assemblymember Chris Holden introduced legislation to extend, AB 102, and expand, AB 103, dual enrollment opportunities for California students. Specifically, AB 102 would eliminate the 2027 sunset date for College and Career Access Pathways (CCAP) partnerships while AB 103 increase access to dual enrollment opportunities for students in juvenile court schools.

“Dual enrollment increases the number of college graduates, reduces time and money spent for college, and helps close the achievement gap,” said Holden. “Making dual enrollment permanent means more school districts will be able to invest in creating these partnership agreements that benefit their students and prepare them for college.”

Dual and concurrent enrollment provides high school students access to college-level coursework. In some cases, students earn both high school and college credit for the same course depending on approval from local school and community college governing boards. Assemblymember Holden first established the College and Career Access Pathways program in 2015 (AB 288) and has since passed numerous bills to increase and expand dual enrollment opportunities through these partnerships.

According to an October 2018 Career Ladders study, students who participate in dual enrollment at a community college during high school are more likely to graduate and enter college and more likely to complete a certificate, degree, or transfer. A key finding was that students most underrepresented in community colleges often benefit the most.

AB 103 would allow juvenile court schools, through the county offices of education, to participate in College and Career Access Pathways partnerships in the same way local school districts do. Students in juvenile court schools experience high rates of educational instability, and are likely to be behind in credits. As the quality of court school education varies widely, many students express that they feel disengaged from school, or that they are constantly repeating material that they have already covered. Increasing educational opportunities, like dual enrollment, for students in juvenile hall could provide a turning point that leads to academic success and future employment.

“Despite the high aspirations of youth in the juvenile justice system for postsecondary educational attainment, the system fails to support access to college,” said Assemblymember Chris Holden. “AB 103 provides an opportunity for a uniquely vulnerable population to make academic progress and jump-start their college education.”

 

 

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